Blog By carausher on 21 April 2017

Soy Free and Gluten Free Sources of Protein

Protein is one of the three macronutrients everyone needs to survive. It strengthens your nails, hair and skin. It helps grow and strengthen your muscles. Additionally, the individual amino acids, the chemical compound building blocks of protein, help aid your body in hundreds of different ways individually. Your body needs protein and it needs complete protein. It might not need it in every meal, but it needs it eventually.

The problem is getting that protein can sometimes be difficult when you’re trying to keep other ingredients out of your diet. For example, many try to avoid gluten and/or soy. Whether you have an autoimmune disease like Celiac, a soy allergy or you simply want to avoid these ingredients for personal reasons, here’s a way to be gluten free and soy free and still get the protein you need.

What Is Gluten?

Gluten is a type of protein found in most types of wheat. Gluten can be found in stuff like wheatberries, durum, emmer, semolina, spelt, farina, farro, graham, rye, barley and triticale. These ingredients are commonly found in the following types of foods:

  • Breads
  • Baked goods
  • Soups
  • Pasta
  • Cereals
  • Sauces
  • Salad dressings
  • Malt
  • Food coloring
  • Beer

It’s important to keep in mind exactly how much food contains one or more of these ingredients. Even many meat dishes like hamburger or sausage will supplement their meat with some sort of wheat byproduct. If you want to keep gluten out of your diet, you need to not only know about the aforementioned foods, but you also have to know how your meat, fish, and veggies are prepared as well.

Now if you’re thinking, “Gluten is in a lot of foods,” you’re right. But that does not mean people who choose not to eat gluten must live off of carrots and water for the rest of their life.

There are many gluten alternatives out there. Some examples of gluten free protein include:

  • Meat
  • Poultry
  • Fish
  • Dairy
  • Soy
  • Beans
  • Legumes
  • Nuts
  • Brown Rice
  • Quinoa
  • Flax
  • Chia
  • Nut flours

It’s just important that you make sure that none of these items had any wheat products added to them. Make sure to look at the ingredient lists of anything you wish to buy to make sure that their ingredients are absent of anything from the first list and chock full of foods from the second list.

What Is Soy?

Soy is a plant whose bean is consumed by cultures all around the world. It’s known for having a relatively high protein content. As soy has become more popular in the west, we’ve seen it appear in more and more places. This is great for those looking for a high protein plant but bad for anyone with a soy allergy.

Soy allergies are fairly common which makes the popularity of soy problematic. For most people with allergies, life is pretty straight-forward. If you’re allergic to something, don’t eat it. But it’s not so easy for people with soy allergies

Here’s a short list of foods that likely contain soy:

  • Most asian dishes
  • Bouillon
  • Candy
  • Cereal
  • Chocolate
  • Energy bars
  • Imitation dairy
  • Margarine
  • Mayonnaise
  • Hamburger and sausage
  • Peanut butter
  • Sauces, gravies, soups
  • Vegetable broth
  • Vegetarian meat substitutes

Similar to gluten, the list can quickly get overwhelming if one is trying to avoid soy. Much like gluten, it seems to be everywhere. So what is someone supposed to do if they’re avoiding soy but still want to consume protein? Obviously the answer is to find soy free alternatives.

Some examples of soy free protein include:

  • Spirulina
  • Spinach
  • Hemp Seeds
  • Broccoli
  • Almonds
  • Peanuts
  • Beans (Excluding soybeans)
  • Quinoa
  • Flax
  • Pumpkin seeds
  • Brown Rice
  • Peas
  • Avocados

Gluten and Soy Free Protein

Right now you’re looking at several lengthy lists telling you to eat this and not that. Diets, whether short term for weight loss, or long term lifestyle changes, are difficult to navigate. It can quickly become intimidating if you’re looking for sources of protein that are both gluten free and soy free. That’s why we made this comprehensive list for you. Now, if you’re looking to avoid one but not the other, you can do that, or you can avoid both at the same time.

Some examples of gluten free and soy free protein include:

  • Beans (Excluding soybeans)
  • Nuts
  • Quinoa
  • Hemp seeds
  • Flax
  • Pumpkin Seeds
  • Chia Seeds
  • Brown Rice
  • Dark, leafy greens
  • Peas
  • Avocado
  • Broccoli
  • Meat
  • Poultry
  • Fish
  • Dairy
  • Spirulina
  • Spinach

Conclusion

Nutrition isn’t always easy and it only gets more difficult if you’re looking for a balanced meal while avoiding certain kinds of food. Millions struggle day after day trying to figure out what to eat for dinner and the problem is only compounded when an allergy is introduced.

That’s where IONutrition comes in. IONutrition takes all of the hard work out of meal planning by providing you with fresh, healthy meals that are ready-to-eat. The experts at IONutrition can also cater your specific meal plans to your specific diet. Do you want to eat organic? IONutrition can help with that. Want to eat Paleo? IONutrition has your back there too.

Their meal plans cover a variety of dietary restrictions. That includes meals for people looking for gluten free protein and soy free protein. Check out their gluten free and soy free protein meal plans today. They’re so delicious that you may choose to eat that way even if you don’t have a specific allergy.

Take the work out of meal planning and the guess work out of food avoidance with IONutrition. It’s the healthiest choice you can make today.